10 weather science experiments

Weather science experiments are always a fun way to teach our kids a great lesson!   Kids learn so much more when they are involved, whether it is with a simple weather coloring sheet or a fun hands-on experiment!

10 weather science experiments

Make wind.    You can teach your children how wind and air pressure works with a  few materials: a plastic bag, two sponges, a straw and a cotton ball.

Make it rain in a jar.  This is so very easy!  Take a vase filled with water.  Put shaving cream on the very top and let the kids put blue food coloring  (rain) on the shaving cream (clouds) and watch it drip into the water (air)

Make a tornado.   Simply fill tall bottle with water and squirt in a small amount of non-concentrated dish soap. Cover tightly.  Shake it up, give it a little roll with your wrist and see your tornado form!

Make a cloud-  just  place a bar of ivory soap in the microwave it for about 90 seconds and watch it expand!  (careful, it will be hot!)

Make fog in a jar.    this is really fun!  It does require a match and boiling water, so you will want to be careful with this one.

Make a tornado with two soda bottles and this connector found on amazon.    You just add water and connect the bottles.  Twirl the bottles and watch them make a tornado  (add some glitter for a little more fun!)

Make it rain inside – put boiling water into a vase or mason jar and place a bowl on top of the vase (acting as a lid).   Once it fills with vapor, put a few ice cubes into the bowl, changing the temperature of the bowl (the lid).   Now when the warm air hits the cold bowl, it will form water droplets and “rain” inside of your vase/jar.   Be patient with it – just like real rain, it takes a while to accumulate.

Let your kids make lightening!  Just take an inflated balloon and rub it on your child’s hair or your hair, for two minutes.  Immediately go into a dark room and touch a spoon.  You can also make lightening with a pencil, styrofoam plate, thumbtack and pie tin.

Have a weather bath!  Dye the bath water blue and give them fun bathtub weather stickers,  a colander to let it ‘rain’, shaving cream for the clouds and let them have fun!

Make a paper cup anemometer to measure the wind.   You can take this outside on a windy day and again on a non-windy day and let your kids see when the wind is the strongest.  I would document it on a chart for about a week’s time and see which day was the windiest and talk about how the days were similar on windy days or on non-windy days.  (Was it rainy that day?  Was it overcast?  Was it cold?  etc ¦)

Thanks for reading- now head off and do any of these fun weather activities with your kids (and have a blast!)  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.