3 Ways to Make Public Speaking for Kids Easier

Public speaking for kids is something that I hadn’t thought much about until I realized how much my kids were doing at school.  When you think about it, speaking in front of a class can be just as intimidating for kids as it is for adults!  

Public speaking is an incredibly important life skill to develop and we have some pubic speaking games and public speaking activities for kids of all ages to make it easier.

3 ways to help kids with public speaking - Kids Activities Blog - young girl with microphone in front of her speaking
Public speaking activities for kids help them gain comfort and skills.

These public speaking activities will help them become better communicators while having fun at the same time.  Kids Activities Blog is super excited to welcome  Andrea Smit from Public Speaking for Kids for being a Quirky Momma for the day  to bring us these great ideas.

Public Speaking for Kids

Throughout their lives your kids will have to communicate, persuade and present to other people, both professionally and socially.

Many adults clam up when required to do such a thing, especially in front of audiences.

But if you encourage your child to learn the many skills required for effective public speaking and presentations from a young age, and you make it fun, they will grow up to be confident communicators who can make a difference to their environment by using the right words at the right times to get the right things done.

Public speaking for kids - public speaking games - girl in front of class
Working on public speaking games at home can help kids feel more confident in classroom.

Public Speaking Games that Teach Skills

Here are some fun and quirky activities you can do with your child, for free, to equip them with public speaking and communication skills.

 1. Observe the Journey Game

  1. Whilst driving, walking or on public transport, ask your child to describe as much of their surroundings as they can within one minute!
  2. Get them to think about shapes, colors and what is happening.
  3. After multiple attempts over days/weeks your child will begin to speak more clearly and sharpen their observation skills which are essential for speaking well.

2. The Woof Game

This hilarious game will build your child’s ability to think on their feet- essential for presentation skills.

  1. Choose a common word like it or be.
  2. Provide your child with a topic to speak on for thirty seconds.
  3. Every time the chosen word is to appear in their speech they should replace it with woof.

For example: Woof is a sunny day today. I am glad woof is not raining.

3. Imaginary Animal Game

Get a group of family members , neighbors and friends together with your kids.

  1. Ask each group member to think of an animal and give them one minute to think of how they would describe that animal.
  2. Each member must then be questioned by their fellow members on the size, color(s), habitat and other attributes until they discover what animal it is.

This will boost your child’s confidence as it will familiarize them with speaking to an audience as somebody with unique information.

Public speaking games for kids to improve confidence - teen boy giving class presentation - Kids Activities Blog
When kids gain public speaking confidence, talking in public is fun!

More Kids Activities that Improve Communication Skills

Do you have other fun ideas for improving the skill of communication for kids?  We hope these public speaking games & activities sparked some creative ideas for you.  

For more fun kids activities, take a look at these ideas:

Add your public speaking advice, games and activities for kids to gain this important life skill below.  How are you tackling public speaking and kids at home or in the classroom?

6 Comments

  1. What fantastic games to get kids into public speaking! I particularly love the wolf game! As a high school English teacher, I have seen so many students over the past few years who not only lack the skills to speak confidently and articulately in public, they actually flatly refuse to do so even when required to for an assessment. There seems to be a trend occurring at the moment where no-one wants to make students speak in public (at least in my experience as a teacher in Australia) for fear of embarrassing or humiliating them and then having to later deal with irate parents. I’ve also spoken on the phone to many parents who believe their child should not have to do any sort of public speaking at school in they do not wish to do so. This is disturbing because, as you wrote, they will need these skills so desperately throughout the rest of their lives both socially and professionally. I’ve taught students who communicate enthusiastically with each other over facebook but lack the social skills to speak to each other face to face when they see each other at school. Getting in early and teaching them these skills using games like the ones you outlined above is such a wonderful way to get them speaking in front of people in a fun situation and thereby developing these essential skills. Thanks for the game ideas – I’m going to play the wolf game with my son when he gets home from school!

  2. These ideas are really great! I love the woof game 🙂 I think it’s fun but helpful at the same time. Thanks for linking up at the Less Laundry, More Linking party.

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  5. I’m curious what age to start this with? I am very good at public speaking however my kindergartener is very shy in front of people. I know how much it has helped me in my life I want to start her on a good path. I can’t see her doing the woof game but the other 2 maybe?

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