Chemical Reactions for Kids: Baking Soda Experiment

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Mixing together ingredients used in cooking is a safe and fun way to explore chemical reactions for kids. This baking soda experiment gives you an example of the possibilities.

Kids Activities Blog hopes you enjoy this little experiment as much as your kids will.

Chemical Reactions for Kids: Baking Soda Experiment

Chemical Reactions for Kids

Supplies Needed:

  • Different edible liquids from the kitchen
    • vinegar
    • milk
    • orange juice
    • lemon juice
    • other fruit juices
    • water
    • tea
    • pickle juice
    • any other drinks your child wants to test
  • Baking soda
  • cups, bowls, or containers for the liquids

Design and Conduct the Experiment

Measure out equal amounts of the liquids into different containers. We added 1/4 cup of each liquid to different silicone baking cups. {Allow your child to have some control in designing the experiment. How much – within reason – would he like to use? Just make sure to use the same amount of each liquid.}

Add equal amounts of baking soda to each container. We added one teaspoon of baking soda to each liquid. {Again, allow your child to decide how much to add.}

Observe what happens when you add the baking soda to the liquids. Do you see a chemical reaction? How do you know? {Bubbles are a sign that a chemical reaction has taken place.}

Kids love this baking soda experiment {Chemical reactions for kids}

Baking Soda Experiment

Talk about the Results

Which liquids reacted with the baking soda?

What do these liquids have in common?

The following liquids reacted for us: vinegar, orange juice, lemon juice, grape juice, a blended vegetable and fruit juice, and limeade. All of these liquids are acidic. The reactions are all similar to a baking soda and vinegar reaction. The baking soda and liquids react together much like baking soda and vinegar do producing carbon dioxide, water, and a salt. {The salts produced are different in each reaction.} The bubbles you see are carbon dioxide gas being formed.

Some of the liquids produced more bubbles – they reacted more with the baking soda. Why?

More Kids Activities

What other ways have you explored chemical reactions with kids in the kitchen?  We hope this baking soda experiment was a great introduction for them.  For more great science related kids activities, take a look at these ideas:

Trisha About Trisha

Trisha is a stay at home mom to her 3-year old son, Aiden. She writes about their adventures at Inspiration Laboratories, a blog dedicated to encouraging learning through creativity and play. Trisha is an educator with a passion for science literacy. It is never too early to start encouraging science learning (or any kind of learning for that matter). Follow along on Facebook, Twitter as @inspire_labs, Google+, and Pinterest.

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